Pondering, and maybe some photos


Blog Fodder Archive: Glyph concert

Jessica Jones | 11:24 am | December 4, 2011

We have a Peter Apfelbaum and the New York Hieroglyphics concert coming up next week at the Jazz Gallery in NYC. In honor of that, I post this ditty I wrote about how it feels to play with the Hieroglyphics. It was written 30 years ago, but it’s pretty much the same. Always a highlight for me. Thanks for being the Scoutmaster, Peter.

NY Hieroglyphics (the band now) - I don't have a picture of the band way back when

1981, reflecting on a Hieroglyphics gig in SF the year before

Peanuts and a plastic half-pint container of orange juice – the peanuts always have too much salt – and maybe a bag of corn chips.  Browse in a couple of Castro street card stores, wander amicably back to the Great American Music Hall.  Downstairs, bidi smoke, and beautiful men deciding which hat looks best with these sunglasses. Casual greetings indicative of a tight friendship.  Assessment of neighbor’s new sax accessory, mention of typically late band members who will no doubt have some exotic explanation involving public transportation.

“The Hieroglyphics Ensemble…” Bang – the music. Strong, rough at the releases, brusk and gentle, and fat tones and skinny tones and the best brand of confidence all singing one song.

And the audience sings too, with its faces.

The music is made of possibilities and of remembering what it’s like to be alive.

After the concert, everyone is six steps closer to each other than they’d ever admit.  ”Where you hangin’?” ” Can I have a hit of that? That was a raw solo.”

After the Flints’ BBQ, after the recreative drugs, and the hearing the tape of the concert, after the teasing, after the silence of comraderie – we go back to our various pockets of home.

1 Comment

Comment by Mark | December 4, 2011 | 11:07 pm

Sweet! So evocative! That’s exactly how I remember the beginnings of most of the Hiero gigs I’ve been to: BANG. Thanks for sharing this. Looking forward to the gig!


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